Posts tagged gods without men

worddogs:

This is Lila, canine heiress to the WORD throne…

Is it odd that I noticed the cover design elements from Nick Harkaway’s Angelmaker and Hari Kunzru’s Gods Without Men before I noticed the dog?

worddogs:

This is Lila, canine heiress to the WORD throne…

Is it odd that I noticed the cover design elements from Nick Harkaway’s Angelmaker and Hari Kunzru’s Gods Without Men before I noticed the dog?

Illustration by O.O.P.S.
"The Translit author assumes the reader has the wits to connect the dots and blend the perfumes. ‘Gods Without Men’ is exemplary in this way." —Douglas Coupland, The New York Times Book Review

Illustration by O.O.P.S.

"The Translit author assumes the reader has the wits to connect the dots and blend the perfumes. ‘Gods Without Men’ is exemplary in this way." —Douglas Coupland, The New York Times Book Review

The Paris Review Interviews Hari Kunzru

  • Paris Review: The first time I read about you, you were described as having “a nonspecifically exotic appearance” that marked you “as a potential native of about half the world’s nations.” How do you usually explain your origins?
  • Hari Kunzru: I was born in London. Depending on who I’m talking to, and how I feel, I might describe myself simply as a Londoner, British (that one’s only crept in since I came to live in New York—to anyone in the UK, it’s weirdly meaningless), English, the son of an Indian father and an English mother, Kashmiri Pandit, rootless cosmopolitan . . .
  • Paris Review: I read someone like Zadie Smith and am struck by how skilled she is with voices. And this talent is so readily visible in GODS WITHOUT MEN, too. Not to be a sociological determinist, but is there something about this generation of writers that makes you particularly adept at doing this kind of tongue tripping?
  • Hari Kunzru: Yes. I’d agree with that—doing voices, performing selves. It’s an important skill, when you’re thrown into a situation where ideas about race and culture are highly charged, and you don’t have a simple answer for people when they ask where you’re from.
The New York Times does the math. Read their review of Gods Without Men.

The New York Times does the math. Read their review of Gods Without Men.

He takes pains with historical accuracy, writes beautifully constructed sentences, does not pander to a dumbed-down reading public, never settles for the carelessly selected phrase but almost unerringly gets the correct word for the situation…

Annie Proulx, Financial Times review of Hari Kunzru’s Gods Without Men. 

RSVP for next Wednesday’s event, where Hari Kunzru will discuss his latest book with National Book Critics Circle Award nominee Teju Cole!

(via nypl)

You’re looking at one of Flavorwire’s 10 must-read books for March.
"[Hari Kunzru] is a novelist in superb command of his craft, singularly equipped to  join all the strands of that rich experience in a single story." - The Washington Post
Gods Without Men, available now.

"[Hari Kunzru] is a novelist in superb command of his craft, singularly equipped to join all the strands of that rich experience in a single story." - The Washington Post

Gods Without Men, available now.