Posts tagged art

John Updike (1932-2009) delighted us during his lifetime with the variety of his gifts—as novelist, literary critic, poet, and also as a keen commentator on the art scene. In the fall, Always Looking: Essays on Art, appeared, collecting his final considerations of certain highlights of Western art over the last two hundred years—from the landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church to the steely sculptural worlds of Richard Serra, from the extravagances of Klimt to the Pop of Oldenburg and Lichtenstein. Today’s poem brings us this American master of word and image reflecting on the trajectory of the Dutch painter Piet Mondrian.

Piet
How strange to see an arrow-straight career!Trees, the attempt to do the branches justice in honest Dutch style, led him, twig by twig,into the net of the rectilinear,of crosses and dashes and then thick framesfor colors prime and pure as chalice jewels,panels of heaven blazing between girders;he believed the world could be sublimated. Things and scenes no longer troubled him;a square tipped onto its corner was allhe needed grant the cockeyed real untilManhattan greeted his exile with jazz,with boogie-woogie and a grid of streetsthat proved his dream to be (bull’s-eye!) the fact.

Download a printable version of the broadside of this poem here or by clicking the image at the top of the post.
Learn more about Americana and Always Looking, and browse other titles by John Updike.
To share the poem-a-day experience with friends, pass along this link »

John Updike (1932-2009) delighted us during his lifetime with the variety of his gifts—as novelist, literary critic, poet, and also as a keen commentator on the art scene. In the fall, Always Looking: Essays on Art, appeared, collecting his final considerations of certain highlights of Western art over the last two hundred years—from the landscapes of Frederic Edwin Church to the steely sculptural worlds of Richard Serra, from the extravagances of Klimt to the Pop of Oldenburg and Lichtenstein. Today’s poem brings us this American master of word and image reflecting on the trajectory of the Dutch painter Piet Mondrian.

Piet

How strange to see an arrow-straight career!
Trees, the attempt to do the branches justice
in honest Dutch style, led him, twig by twig,
into the net of the rectilinear,
of crosses and dashes and then thick frames
for colors prime and pure as chalice jewels,
panels of heaven blazing between girders;
he believed the world could be sublimated.

Things and scenes no longer troubled him;
a square tipped onto its corner was all
he needed grant the cockeyed real until
Manhattan greeted his exile with jazz,
with boogie-woogie and a grid of streets
that proved his dream to be (bull’s-eye!) the fact.

Download a printable version of the broadside of this poem here or by clicking the image at the top of the post.

Learn more about Americana and Always Looking, and browse other titles by John Updike.

To share the poem-a-day experience with friends, pass along this link »

Just Looking (1989)
Still Looking (2005)
Always Looking (2012)
Three collections of John Updike’s writings on art, making me wonder why I’m not spending today in a museum. 

Just Looking (1989)

Still Looking (2005)

Always Looking (2012)

Three collections of John Updike’s writings on art, making me wonder why I’m not spending today in a museum. 


No Country For Old Men by Rocco Malatesta


No Country For Old Men
 by Rocco Malatesta

borzoidaily:

Великий князь Владимир Александрович на охоте

Borzois: trawling the field of literature.

borzoidaily:

Великий князь Владимир Александрович на охоте

Borzois: trawling the field of literature.

notesfromtheroughfront:

thecomposites:

The Bird Man, Swamplandia!, Karen Russell
A puffy white face on which, compared to the boots and the patchwork outfit, looked almost ordinary. The man was blinking violently down at me, caught in the light, his pale lips twisted in a grimace…This man’s age was impossible for me to guess. He was younger than my grandfather and older than my brother. His eyes were something terrifying…Bright eyes in a shingled face…The Bird Man frowned, which turned his long nose into a blade. Light caught on his whistle and in the soft, wet curls of hair around his ears, but his eyes were dull as gunmetal. He’d scratched his thin hair into a pompadour—it looked as though every wire were coming disconnected in his brain. (Suggested by phaunosfaunus)

I love this blog!  According to the blog, they take images created using a commercially available law enforcement composite sketch software and descriptions of literary characters. All interesting suggestions considered. Include descriptive passages if you can. Please send suggestions!

Wow. Not how I imagined the Bird Man, but I’m impressed that The Composite is doing this.

notesfromtheroughfront:

thecomposites:

The Bird Man, Swamplandia!, Karen Russell

A puffy white face on which, compared to the boots and the patchwork outfit, looked almost ordinary. The man was blinking violently down at me, caught in the light, his pale lips twisted in a grimace…This man’s age was impossible for me to guess. He was younger than my grandfather and older than my brother. His eyes were something terrifying…Bright eyes in a shingled face…The Bird Man frowned, which turned his long nose into a blade. Light caught on his whistle and in the soft, wet curls of hair around his ears, but his eyes were dull as gunmetal. He’d scratched his thin hair into a pompadour—it looked as though every wire were coming disconnected in his brain. (Suggested by phaunosfaunus)

I love this blog!  According to the blog, they take images created using a commercially available law enforcement composite sketch software and descriptions of literary characters. All interesting suggestions considered. Include descriptive passages if you can. Please send suggestions!

Wow. Not how I imagined the Bird Man, but I’m impressed that The Composite is doing this.

headvertising:

“Come with a story and leave with another.”

Advertising Agency: Lowe/SSP3, Bogota, Colombia
Creative Chairman: Jose Miguel Sokoloff
Creative Director: Gustavo Marioni, Carlos Camacho
Art Director: Andres Lancheros, Guillermo Siachoque, Sebastian Pelaez
Copywriter: Mario Lagos
Producer: Sonia Llanos
Account Director: Carlos Obando

Great campaign strategy all-around. 

murakamistuff:

Wallpaper version of Cory Schmitz’ alternate 1Q84 cover.
Enjoy this great piece of art in a high resolution on your desktop!

Desktop art!

murakamistuff:

Wallpaper version of Cory Schmitz’ alternate 1Q84 cover.

Enjoy this great piece of art in a high resolution on your desktop!

Desktop art!

Cool things happening over @ Doubleday

Cool things happening over @ Doubleday