Posts tagged Judith Jones

ransomcenter:

In honor of Julia Child’s birthday today, enjoy these images from the Knopf archive at the Ransom Center that document the road to publication for “Mastering the Art of French Cooking.” 

To learn more about these letters, read “‘The Proper Binge’: Julia Child in the Ransom Center Archives.”

“L’École des Trois Gourmandes: Louisette Bertholle, Simone (Simca) Beck, and Julia Child.” 1953. Photograph by Paul Child. Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. records.

Cover of a first edition of “Mastering the Art of French Cooking,” 1961.

A letter from Judith Jones to Avis DeVoto dated May 6, 1960. Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. records.

A letter from Julia Child to Judith Jones dated February 25, 1961. Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. records.

A letter from Julia Child to Judith Jones dated October 31, 1960. Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. records.

How did I miss this yesterday?? Anything the Ransom Center reveals from the Knopf archive is a special treat. Thanks for taking such good care of it, friends.

Marion Cunningham, 1922-2012
“Marion Cunningham epitomized good American food. She was recommended to me by Jim Beard when we agreed to take over The Fannie Farmer Cookbook and update it from start to finish. She was someone who had an ability to take a dish, savor it in her mouth, and give it new life. At a time when Americans were embracing all kinds of foreign cuisine, Marion Cunningham’s love and respect for American food helped The Fannie Farmer Cookbook once again earn a place in kitchens across America.” —Judith Jones

Marion Cunningham, 1922-2012

“Marion Cunningham epitomized good American food. She was recommended to me by Jim Beard when we agreed to take over The Fannie Farmer Cookbook and update it from start to finish. She was someone who had an ability to take a dish, savor it in her mouth, and give it new life. At a time when Americans were embracing all kinds of foreign cuisine, Marion Cunningham’s love and respect for American food helped The Fannie Farmer Cookbook once again earn a place in kitchens across America.” —Judith Jones

An oldie from our Flickr archives—Julie Powell, Knopf editor Judith Jones, and Nora Ephron from around the time of the Julie & Julia film release.

An oldie from our Flickr archives—Julie Powell, Knopf editor Judith Jones, and Nora Ephron from around the time of the Julie & Julia film release.

Be sure to join the Julia Child 100th birthday celebration on tumblr: jc100.tumblr.com
jc100:

JC 100 Culinary Luminary:  Judith Jones
Judith Jones is Julia Child’s longtime editor and close friend.
Judith Jones is senior editor and vice president at Alfred A. Knopf, where she has worked since 1957. She is the author of a cookbook, The Pleasures of Cooking for One, a memoir, The Tenth Muse:  My Life in Food, and co-author (with Evan Jones, her late husband) of three cookbooks:  The Book of Bread; Knead It, Punch It, Bake It!; and The Book of New New England Cookery. She also collaborated with Angus Cameron on The L. L. Bean Game and Fish Cookbook. She has contributed to Vogue, Saveur, Departures, and Gourmet magazines. In 2006, she was awarded the James Beard Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award, and the following year the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Association of Culinary Professionals. She lives in New York City and Vermont.

Be sure to join the Julia Child 100th birthday celebration on tumblr: jc100.tumblr.com

jc100:

JC 100 Culinary Luminary:  Judith Jones

Judith Jones is Julia Child’s longtime editor and close friend.

Judith Jones is senior editor and vice president at Alfred A. Knopf, where she has worked since 1957. She is the author of a cookbook, The Pleasures of Cooking for One, a memoir, The Tenth Muse:  My Life in Food, and co-author (with Evan Jones, her late husband) of three cookbooks:  The Book of Bread; Knead It, Punch It, Bake It!; and The Book of New New England Cookery. She also collaborated with Angus Cameron on The L. L. Bean Game and Fish Cookbook. She has contributed to Vogue, Saveur, Departures, and Gourmet magazines. In 2006, she was awarded the James Beard Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award, and the following year the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Association of Culinary Professionals. She lives in New York City and Vermont.

Judith Jones, Knopf’s legendary cookbook editor of Julia Child and countless other master chefs, shares her definition of a classic dish in this week’s edition of Gourmet Live.

Judith Jones, Knopf’s legendary cookbook editor of Julia Child and countless other master chefs, shares her definition of a classic dish in this week’s edition of Gourmet Live.

Dining with Judith and Julia. Vermont’s Seven Days talks with Publisher and sometime Vermonter Judith Jones on celebrating 50 years of Mastering the Art of French Cooking

Dining with Judith and Julia. Vermont’s Seven Days talks with Publisher and sometime Vermonter Judith Jones on celebrating 50 years of Mastering the Art of French Cooking

Rescuing the diary of Anne Frank

vintageanchor:

“After more than 50 years in publishing, Judith Jones has earned a reputation as a master of cookbooks. Among the many works that fill her dossier as an editor is Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking (1960), which gave post-war Americans something different from meatloaf and tuna casserole.

Jones confesses that she has always loved cooking, so it’s no surprise that much of her legacy as senior editor and vice president at Knopf fills millions of kitchen shelves around the world. But all of these cookbooks merely overshadow what is arguably her most important contribution to the world of literature–one that she made at the beginning of her career.

 “It was around 1950, and I was in Paris working for Doubleday as an assistant to Frank Price, who the company had sent over to scout titles,” Jones recalls. “Our office was a rather beautiful apartment on the rue de la Faisanderie, and one afternoon, Frank went off to a lunch appointment and left me with a pile of manuscripts for rejection. He wanted me to write the letters and send them off.”

So, Jones began typing the letters for one manuscript after another, when the pile revealed something that caught her eye. A 12-year-old girl with thick, black hair, chestnut eyes, and a bright smile gazed back at her from the cover of a French translation entitled The Diary of a Young Girl.

Even in black and white, the girl’s face radiated a warmth and innocence that Jones could not ignore. Instead of reaching for another sheet of Doubleday letterhead, on which she had written the other rejections, she opened the book and began reading.

Jones soon found herself immersed in the world of Annelies Marie Frank, a Jewish girl living with her mother, father, and sister in Nazi-occupied Amsterdam. For her 13th birthday, Anne’s father, Otto, gave her a plaid-covered journal in which she began her diary…”

Inspired by Allison Pearson’s new novel, I Think I Love You, the Knopf editors reveal their teen crushes.

(They’re a classy bunch. Did no one else crush on Devon Sawa?! Who was your teen crush?)