Posts tagged Glen Duncan

Read the full New York Times review here.

Read the full New York Times review here.

On New Year’s Eve 2009, a friend asked me what I was “hoping to achieve” in the next 12 months. Resisting the urge to break a bottle over his head, I said — for no reason I can now remember — that I was going to write a novel about the last surviving werewolf. Agreement that this was a good idea was slurred but unanimous.
Glen Duncan on how he came to write The Last Werewolf and Talulla Rising. The rest of the interview is just as good—read it!
A full moon reveal: remember how the pages of Glen Duncan’s The Last Werewolf were edged in blood-red? Here’s a first look at the final copies of his follow-up, Talulla Rising, with pages edged in black!

A full moon reveal: remember how the pages of Glen Duncan’s The Last Werewolf were edged in blood-red? Here’s a first look at the final copies of his follow-up, Talulla Rising, with pages edged in black!

Author Glen Duncan: I'm amazed people don't write more about sex

The Metro [UK] knows how to write a headline.

“There is something liberating about a novel like this. As well as offering a new vantage point from which to consider the old questions of life, it also provides a welcome fantasy in which there is not just extreme sex and violence (including the werewolf lovers’ full-moon ritual “fuckkilleat”), but also smoking, drinking and a lot of very fancy hotels. Werewolves can’t get cancer and don’t need pensions. Who wouldn’t want to be part of their world for a while?”
—The Guardian [UK] on Glen Duncan’s follow-up to The Last Werewolf.

“There is something liberating about a novel like this. As well as offering a new vantage point from which to consider the old questions of life, it also provides a welcome fantasy in which there is not just extreme sex and violence (including the werewolf lovers’ full-moon ritual “fuckkilleat”), but also smoking, drinking and a lot of very fancy hotels. Werewolves can’t get cancer and don’t need pensions. Who wouldn’t want to be part of their world for a while?”

The Guardian [UK] on Glen Duncan’s follow-up to The Last Werewolf.